Wednesday, July 01, 2009

Live Demo! Prestige Total Intensity Liners

I'm going to do something different today. I was thinking over the weekend about how you can blog and blog and blog and blog about a product- but you don't get the full gist of how something works...if you don't actually see it in action.

This is what came to mind when I was thinking about the Prestige Total Intensity Eyeliners. Now, I've spoken about these before and have claimed that these could probably stay on through a hurricane (well...maybe...). I can write and take pictures all I want- but you can't really see how well these hold up.

That's when I decided to make a video. *Gasp* Yes, a VIDEO!!!! Don't think I'm going to run off to YouTube and be one of those Makeup Guru's- because that's not my shtick (I prefer to stay behind the camera instead of in front!!). I admit that I had to record the following video about 4 times, but no matter how many times I did it, I just sound super silly :)

Anyways, here is the "Live Demo" in all my nerdy voice glory:



Sigh. I couldn't hang doing makeup videos. This took way too long to make and WAY too long to upload! Either way- I hope you enjoyed this one ;)

8 comments:

stefanie said...

first of all, you don't sound stupid! second of all, this looks like an amazing product. i really need to try it!

Tiso said...

Congrats on your first video - excellent job! No kidding. Will def check these out. Thanks!!

Anonymous said...

Great job on the video, and your voice is cute... I'd watch more of your videos if you ever did them!

Anonymous said...

What store did you find these liners at? Thanks

Recessionista! said...

Love your live demo (and your voice!). These liners are so great, but I'm still having some issues when I put too much on my lower lash line--the oils in my skin mixed with my eye cream cause it to smudge and run a bit after a few hours, but I find that the less I use on the lower lid the better, and if I blend the liner on the lower lid it helps A LOT. :)

Tanya @ The Pink Train Case said...

@ Anon #2: You can buy these wherever you usually find Prestige products. For me, I can find them at Rite Aid, Walgreens, and some Longs/CVS stores (of course, stores may vary by your location!).

Anonymous said...

Good job. More videos. Thanks!

Leo Voisey said...

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), or the pathological restriction of venous vessel discharge from the CNS has been proposed by Zamboni, et al, as having a correlative relationship to Multiple Sclerosis. From a clinical perspective, it has been demonstrated that the narrowed jugular veins in an MS patient, once widened, do affect the presenting symptoms of MS and the overall health of the patient. It has also been noted that these same veins once treated, restenose after a time in the majority of cases. Why the veins restenose is speculative. One insight, developed through practical observation, suggests that there are gaps in the therapy protocol as it is currently practiced. In general, CCSVI therapy has focused on directly treating the venous system and the stenosed veins. Several other factors that would naturally affect vein recovery have received much less consideration. As to treatment for CCSVI, it should be noted that no meaningful aftercare protocol based on evidence has been considered by the main proponents of the ‘liberation’ therapy (neck venoplasty). In fact, in all of the clinics or hospitals examined for this study, patients weren’t required to stay in the clinical setting any longer than a few hours post-procedure in most cases. Even though it has been observed to be therapeutically useful by some of the main early practitioners of the ‘liberation’ therapy, follow-up, supportive care for recovering patients post-operatively has not seriously been considered to be part of the treatment protocol. To date, follow-up care has primarily centered on when vein re-imaging should be done post-venoplasty. The fact is, by that time, most patients have restenosed (or partially restenosed) and the follow-up Doppler testing is simply detecting restenosis and retrograde flow in veins that are very much deteriorated due to scarring left by the initial procedure. This article discusses a variable approach as to a combination of safe and effective interventional therapies that have been observed to result in enduring venous drainage of the CNS to offset the destructive effects of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and to regenerate disease damaged tissue.
As stated, it has been observed that a number of presenting symptoms of MS almost completely vanish as soon as the jugulars are widened and the flows equalize in most MS patients. Where a small number of MS patients have received no immediate benefit from the ‘liberation’ procedure, flows in subject samples have been shown not to have equalized post-procedure in these patients and therefore even a very small retrograde blood flow back to the CNS can offset the therapeutic benefits. Furthermore once the obstructed veins are further examined for hemodynamic obstruction and widened at the point of occlusion in those patients to allow full drainage, the presenting symptoms of MS retreat. This noted observation along with the large number of MS patients who have CCSVI establish a clear association of vein disease with MS, although it is clearly not the disease ‘trigger’.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=978